2017 Workshop Offerings

2017 Workshop Offerings

Workshop

June 12 – 16

June 19 – 23

July 10 – 14

July 17 – 21

Blacksmithing

Warren Holzman

Jorgen Harle

Luke DiBerardinis

Maegan Crowley

Mosaics

Carol Stirton-Broad

Stained Glass

J. Kenneth Leap

Steve Hartley

Jim M. Berberich

Stone Carving

Jens Langlotz

Or give us a call at 267-502-2401

Blacksmithing

Steel Repousse: Painting with an Iron Palette with Warren Holzman

June 12 – 16 | Students will learn the fundamentals related to chasing and repousse in steel.  Repousse is an exciting way to create relief images that exists somewhere between drawing and sculpture.  The approach will focus on dynamic image development not unlike composition related to painting. Students will have the opportunity to work on larger scale pieces created over a wood stump. The course will cover design development, tool making and finishing.

Forged/Fire/Food - Cooking Tool Class with Jorgen Harle

June 19 – 23 | This class will use all the basic forging techniques, and a few advanced ones to explore the tradition of metal as a material to cook food over an open flame. Forks,Tongs,Spatulas, & Spoons will be demonstrated and all students can expect to leave this workshop with some very functional cook ware that will last for generations. Tradition and utility will drive the forms taught in this specialty tool class but personal expression and design will be enthusiastically pursued. Extensive R&D will be done at the end of each project (that’s art speak for BBQ). Knives and cleavers will NOT BE ADDRESSED in this class.

Early American Wrought Iron Hardware with Luke DiBerardinis

July 10 – 14 | Learn the fundamentals of blacksmithing and improve your skills through the forging of historic hardware. Students can expect a daily demonstration of colonial hardware forging and will be able to customize their projects based on skill level.  Topics and demonstrations will cover strap hinges and all their various finials , rams horn hinges, rat tail hinges, pintles, rivets, and clinch nails.  Pull handles, thumb latches and all their parts,  and installation procedures of the hardware will also be covered.   All elements of blacksmithing will be utilized through these projects.  By forging utilitarian and functional, yet highly decorative pieces of house hardware. Students will learn Slitting, punching, drifting, upsetting, drawing, bending, forge welding, and fire management techniques.

Volume and Form with Maegan Crowley

July 17 – 21 | This course is designed to stimulate your metal vocabulary. We will be forging structural materials; learning the tricks of forging pipe, tubing, and channel. Hot and cold sheet forming techniques will also be demonstrated. Pattern making and layout methods will be discussed as we use sheet metal to achieve volume. Students will then have the opportunity to combine techniques to create their own forms. We will also address fabrication methods and  metal finishing. There will be an emphasis on individual expression as I work with each student to develop their own representation of form. Bring a sketchbook and an open mind.

Mosaic

Glass Mosaic with Carol Stirton - Broad

July 10 – 14 | Mosaic Art is having a resurgence in the United States and glass in many forms is playing a major role in this new wave of artistic creativity. In this workshop we will look at several of these types of glass, focusing on the traditional Italian Smalti and comparing it to the products from Mexico, China, and the United States. In addition, we will have a sampling of other materials available including some marble and stone. Each participant will produce a small sampler using traditional techniques. Next you will design a larger piece, using these materials in your own style. We will cover design transfer and realize the final work of art using the direct method.  There are a limited number of hammer and hardies available for you to try as well as a collection of glass nippers for you to experiment with. I hope that you will love this process and the beautiful materials as much as I do.

Stained Glass

Traditional Glass Painting in the Munich Style with J. Kenneth Leap

June 19 – 23 | Learn the art of mixing, applying and firing glass-based paints, enamels and stains. This class will start with the core skills of traditional glass painting – tracing & matting. We will then concentrate on 19th century figurative techniques as exemplified by the Munich Style. Students can choose to practice replicating brocade patterned drapery, foliage, ornamental architectural borders and of course painting the figure. This course will introduce a variety of processes for mixing and layering pigments with exotic mediums. Glass selection and enamel work for flesh will be explored in depth. This class will be of specific interest to restoration painters and to all who admire the techniques of the 19th century. This class is designed to complement the workshop “Stained Glass Repair & Conservation” with Steve Hartley offered July 10-14, 2017

 

More about this class:

1. What specific techniques are covered in this workshop?

Students will learn to work with Reusche glass pigments, stains, and mediums. We will discuss selecting the right glass for the color palette of historic windows. Which brushes to use and how to care for them. How to make color samples and how to use them to replicate the paints of the 19th century. Which mediums and binders to mix with glass pigments for hand-painting including advanced painting techniques for layering pigments. Complete instructions for firing a kiln will be provided. The instructor will present daily demonstrations on these techniques in a clear logical order and students will have plenty of class time to practice the lessons presented. We will look at historic windows in the Munich Style and practice lessons will include: foliage, brocade drapery, landscapes and skies, and the figure. Lessons on the figure will include painting hands and faces. This workshop will be augmented with the study of anatomy and proportion. Students of all levels will benefit from daily drawing exercises.

2. What prior experience do students need? 

A basic understanding of stained glass techniques is helpful. This class will focus on painting. We will not be cutting glass in this class or assembling finished windows. Students of all levels are welcome.

3. What do you say to students who are concerned because they have no prior experience with glass or with design?

Anyone interested in painting, drawing or design will benefit from the material presented in this workshop. While the focus will be on Munich windows the practical skills you learn can be adapted to any painting style, all that is required is a sense of curiosity and the determination to practice the skills. I also offer private instruction out of my studio at Wheaton Arts if you would like a grounding or a refresher in core skills.

4. What do you offer to students with intermediate or advanced experience?

This class has been specifically designed to provide professional training for serious students who are pursuing a deeper understanding of traditional techniques. Whether or not you are a restoration painter as long as you are seeking to improve your skills you will benefit from this class. We all have the capacity to learn more. 

5. What do students make in this class to take home?

Each student will complete between 3 – 5 pieces. Students will have a choice of subject matter adapted from imagery found in Munich Style windows. Additionally students will produce studies and color samples for reference in their own studio. Students will do drawing exercises in their sketchbooks to practice.

6. What tools, supplies or preparatory designs do students need to bring to the class?

Students should bring a sketchbook and drawing materials. A pad of tracing paper. A journal for note taking. Students may also use a digital camera during the workshop. All tools & supplies for class projects will be provided. 

7. Do you supply handouts, material lists or class notes?

Patterns for class projects and material lists will be supplied. Students are responsible for taking their own class notes.

8. Are you available for continuing dialogue after the class ends?

Yes, students frequently call or email me with ongoing questions.

Repair and Conservation of Historic Stained Glass with Steve Hartley

July 10 – 14 | This hands-on course will introduce proper evaluation and documentation techniques for stained glass conservation. Students will participate in repairing a 19th Century stained glass window while practicing conservation techniques including cleaning, copper foil repairs and chemical edge bonding. Restoration painting including glass selection and color matching historic pigments will be discussed and practiced.

 

 

 

 

More about the class:

1. What specific techniques are covered in this workshop?

Students will learn to assess a stained glass window, complete a condition report and recommend a treatment plan. Proper procedures for removing, transporting and safely handling stained glass panels will be discussed. Heath and safety in the studio will be addressed. Students will learn to recognize and treat deflection, paint loss and repair broken and missing pieces. Techniques for Dutchmans, copper foil repairs, and chemical bonding will be demonstrated and practiced. During this class the instructors will repair a 19th century Mayer of Munich window. Students will also benefit from a behind the scenes tour of the Pitcairn collection of Medieval glass at Glencairn Museum where the unique problems involved with conserving medieval glass will be discussed.

2. What prior experience do students need? 

A basic understanding of stained glass techniques is helpful but not necessary. Students of all levels are welcome. Students may prepare by reviewing this text on stained glass restoration guidelines.

3. What do you say to students who are concerned because they have no prior experience with glass or with design?

Anyone interested history, conservation or stewardship will benefit from the material presented in this workshop. This is a rare opportunity to get practical hands-on-training and participate in the restoration of an historic panel.

4. What do you offer to students with intermediate or advanced experience?

This class has been specifically designed to provide professional training for serious students who are pursuing a deeper understanding of restoration techniques and for those responsible for the stewardship of historic windows.

5. What do students make in this class to take home?

Students will make samples of edge gluing, copper foil repairs and Dutchmans. Student will complete a sample condition report that will help them in assessing future projects.  Additionally students will produce color samples of glass pigments for reference in their own studio.

6. What tools, supplies or preparatory designs do students need to bring to the class?

Students should bring a sketchbook and drawing materials. A pad of tracing paper. A journal for note taking. Students may also use a digital camera during the workshop. All tools & supplies for class projects will be provided. 

7. Do you supply handouts, material lists or class notes?

Handouts and a bibliography of further resources will be provided. Students are responsible for taking their own class notes.

8. Are you available for continuing dialogue after the class ends?

Yes, students frequently call or email me with ongoing questions.

The Art of Glass Painting - Keeping it Simple with Jim M. Berberich

July 17 – 21 | You can master the art of glass painting. The simple methods we will use in class have been proven effective and will give you the skills needed to achieving your goals.
As you can imagine, for the thousand years that this applied art form has been in existence, a multitude of techniques have been created. The different approaches have added confusion to this medium. We will focus on some traditional methods with a twist, going into detail on how and why these methods work. There will be demonstrations, open discussion and a lot of one on one guidance from myself.  My objective is for the student to leave with confidence, understanding and the knowledge to create beautiful glass painting. The class projects will include portraits and life subjects, using vitreous paints, enamels and stains.

 

More about the class:

1. What specific techniques are covered in this workshop?

A: We will dicuss some of the different methods and mixing agents used in glass painting today…the good and bad. But on the class projects, we will mostly use a water and gum aribic mix and a clove oil and Anise oil mix. Paints used will be enamels, silver stain and traditional glass stainers.

2. What prior experience do students need? 

A: Some prior experience would be helpful, but not necessary to attend the class. Ever step will be explaned and demonstrated.

3. What do you say to students who are concerned because they have no prior experience with glass or with design?

A: All you need for class, is a strong interest in glass painting, up for a challenge, and do your best.

4. What do you offer to students with intermediate or advanced experience?

A: Painting for over 25 years, I offer my experience and advice on techniques and methods that work best for me, with a clear explanation of why.

5. What do students make in this class to take home?

A: They will have at least three projects from the class to take home, one being a portrait 

6. What tools, supplies or preparatory designs do students need to bring to the class?

A: I will supply most of the tools and brushes we will use in class. Also the school will supply paint, supplies and mixing agents that we can use as well. But please feel free to bring your favorite painting tools and brushes if you like. 

7. Do you supply handouts, material lists or class notes?

A: Yes, I will hand out a list of the tools, supplies and suppliers that are used and dicussed in class. Also notes on the basic methods we will use, but I do suggest to take notes yourself.

8. Are you available for continuing dialogue after the class ends?

A: Yes, I am available for follow-up and questions after the class. You can reach me through email, Facebook or phone.

Stonecarving

Cathedral Stone Carving with Jens Langlotz

June 19 – 23 | Participants will have a rare opportunity to work in the shadow of a working cathedral. Join master mason Jens Langlotz in the historic Bryn Athyn stone shops. Brief demonstrations of techniques will prepare you for shaping your own piece. The workshop covers stone types and properties, the use of different kinds of chisels for texturing, the fundamentals of letter design, both low and high relief carving, and rosette design. You may choose to copy an architectural detail from Bryn Athyn Cathedral, such as one of the rosettes on the side of the building, or make an original piece of your own. No experience is necessary, and more advanced students are always welcome.

 

More about the class:

1. What specific techniques are covered in this workshop?  

Creating Stone Textures/Moldings Patterns/Lettering&Numerals/Simple Ornate geometric designs

2. What prior experience do students need?

Basic Hand Eye Coordination/layout &basic drawing/geometry (reading a ruler)

3. What to say to students who are concerned because they have no prior experience with glass or with design?

Prior experience is not expected students will learn by doing “hands on” work

4. What do you offer to students with intermediate or advanced experience?

Higher level of complexity in Pattern or Letter layout/Ornamentation

5. What do students make in this class to take home? 

Several pieces of limestone with differently developed themes.

6. What tools, supplies or preparatory designs do students need to bring to the class? 

All Tools &Materials are provided. Students are encouraged to wear closed toed shoes in the workshop and prepare to get dusty.

7. Do you supply handouts, material lists or class notes?

Students are encouraged to bring a notebook for sketching and note taking. Information on  where to purchase hand tools will be discussed.

8. Are you available for continuing dialogue with students after the class ends?

Yes